defender1981videogame|Shore-to-ship power supply cable goes online in Malta

11 07
Author:super|Category:wgjilivip

Facilities of the shore-to-ship power supply project are seen in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024defender1981videogame. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

VALLETTA, July 10 (Xinhua) -- Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent.

Speaking at a launch event on Wednesday, Maltese Prime Minister Robert Abela said that as an island country, Malta's ports are at the heart of its economy as they facilitate trade and tourism. Projects like the Grand Harbour's electrification enable the country to act as a pioneer in applying sustainable maritime solutions.

He said this project is one of the best ones of its kind in Europe, making Malta one of the first countries to install a shore-to-ship power supply capable of supplying up to five cruise liners at the same time.

The project, co-financed by the European Union's fund Connecting Europe Facility, will hugely improve the air quality for around 17,000 families who live in this part of Malta.

The system can provide a total of 64 MVA of onshore electricity. It operates with voltages of 11 kV or 5.5 kV and frequencies of 50 or 60 hertz, supported by frequency converter stations equipped with 18 transformers and four frequency converters, which distribute electricity through 90 km of power cables.

The project is expected to reduce CO2 emissions by approximately 30,400 tons per year.

Workers connect onshore electricity cables with a cruise liner in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

Facilities of the shore-to-ship power supply project are seen in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

Workers connect onshore electricity cables with a cruise liner in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

defender1981videogame|Shore-to-ship power supply cable goes online in Malta

Facilities of the shore-to-ship power supply project are seen in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

Maltese Prime Minister Robert Abela speaks at a launch event of the shore-to-ship power supply project in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

Facilities of the shore-to-ship power supply project are seen in Valletta, Malta, on July 10, 2024. Thanks to a 33-million-euro (36 million U.S. dollars) project, cruise liners docking in Malta's Grand Harbour will be able to turn off their engines and connect to onshore electricity, thus reducing their emissions and pollution by 90 percent. (Photo by Jonathan Borg/Xinhua)

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